About Us 

Resilient Infrastructure and Disaster Response (RIDER) Center is a multi-disciplinary research center established at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering.

RIDER Center is founded on the mission of achieving adaptive capacity and resilience for the communities affected by natural disasters such as hurricanes and the COVID-19 pandemic.

RIDER unites engineers, social scientists, social workers, health, public policy, communication, and information specialists synergistically towards developing emergency plans that fit the distinct needs of both urban and rural communities to solve the real-world problem of the “resilience divide.”

RIDER specifically focuses on:

  • Understanding the factors that foster and support the efficacy of disaster resilience in varying population settings
  • Extending our knowledge of community-scale infrastructure limitations in planning for natural disasters
  • Developing long-term strategic adaptation and implementation plans to reduce community vulnerability needed desperately by the under-served areas of the state and the country affected by natural disasters to sustain their communities. 

The Resilience Divide includes the “Vast differences in which individuals and communities experience disaster impacts. For both acute impacts and long-term recovery, factors such as the country or region in which you live, your race, and your socioeconomic status play a large role in determining your ability to thrive — and to be resilient — in the face of a disaster.”  —One Concern


The RIDER Vision

A world in which everyone is resilient to disaster

RIDER’s vision focuses on implementing living laboratories in real-life urban and rural communities and settings, grounded in the scientific exploration of the complex and nonlinear interactions among systems. The key insight underlying this vision is the transformative discoveries through the co-production of solutions with community leaders, residents, government, industry, and researchers. Our unique multidisciplinary approach, along with the close involvement of these stakeholders, will result in new research insights and policy instruments. As our overarching strategy, we seek to become a nationally and globally recognized center of resilience for disasters.

RIDER promotes “all-inclusive” and “equitable” disaster resilience for varying vulnerable population segments, and probes the underlying causes of disaster vulnerability in communities, while accounting for infrastructure characteristics, and social needs factors, and assessing their significance through various computational methods such as machine learning, causality, and regression models. These goals are critical since the associated risks are heterogeneous across population groups and space dependent on the available network, infrastructure, land use, and other localized conditions.

The Resilience Divide

Those who study natural and manmade disasters, as well as a society’s recovery from that disaster, have uncovered some startling facts. More and more, researchers and editors like those from Medium’s “One Concern” are seeing, “vast differences in which individuals and communities experience disaster impacts. For both acute impacts and long-term recovery, factors such as the country or region in which you live, your race, and your socioeconomic status play a large role in determining your ability to thrive — and to be resilient — in the face of a disaster.” This is known as the Resilience Divide. RIDER Center is a direct response to this challenge and one of our goals is eliminating the discrepancy.

 

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